| Home | Subscription | E-Submission | Sitemap | Contact Us |
top_img
17th_aaap_banner
Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 30(6); 2017 > Article
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2017;30(6): 843-848. doi: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.16.0378
Comparative effects of corn-based diet and phase-fed cassava-based diet on growth rate, carcass characteristics and lipid profile of meat-type ducks
Saowalak Saree1, Chaiyapoom Bunchasak1, Choawit Rakangtong1, Jessada Sakdee1, Nuttawut Krutthai1,2, Theerawit Poeikhampha1,*
1Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
2Department of Agricultural Technology and Development, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Chiang Mai Rajabhat University, Chang Mai 50330, Thailand
* Corresponding Author: Theerawit Poeikhampha ,Tel: +66-0-2579-1120, Fax: +66-0-2579-1120, Email: agrtrw@ku.ac.th
Received: May 11, 2016;  Revised: September 2, 2016.  Accepted: September 18, 2016.  Published online September 19, 2016.
Saowalak Saree and Nuttawut Krutthai contributed equally to this work.

ABSTRACT
Objective:
This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of a corn- or cassava- based diet on the production of meat-type ducks.
Method:
Four hundred day-old ducks were used in this experiment. They were divided into five groups with each group replicated eight times. The ducks fed the corn-based diets served as the control group. The four other groups comprised different treatments, with each one given the cassava-based diet based on phase-feeding. Three treatments were fed the cassava-based diet from 16, 28, and 35 d; respectively up to 42 d of age and the other group was fed the cassava-based diet from 1 to 42 d of age.
Results:
The results indicated that ducks on either the corn- or cassava-based diets were similar in growth during 1 to 9 d of age. However, toward 35 to 42 d, the cassava-diet produced a higher weight gain (p<0.05). The cassava-based diet was better than the corn-based diet at increasing the outer and inner breast weights at 28, 35, or 42 d (p<0.05). In contrast, the corn-based diet was better at increasing abdominal fat (p<0.05). The two diets did not differ in their effects on the serum triglyceride, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and liver cholesterol. The corn-based diet, however, caused a highly significantly greater level of liver triglyceride (p<0.01).
Conclusion:
The results of this study suggest that both the cassava- and corn- based diets are similar in their effect on meat-type ducks during the starter stage but toward the finisher stage, the cassava-based diet has a better influence on weight gain and carcass characteristics.
Keywords: Feedstuffs; Cassava; Corn; Ducks; Phase Feeding; Lipid Metabolism
TOOLS
PDF Links  PDF Links
Full text via DOI  Full text via DOI
Download Citation  Download Citation
CrossRef TDM  CrossRef TDM
  E-Mail
Share:      
METRICS
0
Crossref
0
Scopus
702
View
4
Download
Effects of Dietary Octacosanol on Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality of Broiler Chicks  2016 October;29(10)
Effects of Onion Extracts on Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Blood Profiles of White Mini Broilers  2015 February;28(2)
Effects of Flaxseed Diets on Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Fatty Acid Composition of Hanwoo Steers  2009 August;22(8)
The Effects of Docking on Growth Traits, Carcass Characteristics and Blood Biochemical Parameters of Sanjabi Fat-tailed Lambs  2009 June;22(6)
Effects of Dietary Copper Source and Level on Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Lipid Metabolism in Lambs  2008 May;21(5)
Editorial Office
Asian-Australasian Association of Animal Production Societies(AAAP)
Room 708 Sammo Sporex, 23, Sillim-ro 59-gil, Gwanak-gu, Seoul
08776, Korea   TEL : +82-2-888-6558    FAX : +82-2-888-6559   
E-mail : jongkha@hotmail.com
About |  Browse Articles |  Current Issue |  For Authors and Reviewers |  Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2014 by Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences. All rights reserved.                 powerd by m2community