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Ruminant Nutrition and Forage Utilization
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2010;23(3): 333-339.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2010.80040    Published online February 22, 2010.
Modeling Nutrient Supply to Ruminants: Frost-damaged Wheat vs. Normal Wheat
P. Yu, V. Racz
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to use the NRC-2001 model and DVE/OEB system to model potential nutrient supply to ruminants and to compare frost damaged (also called “frozen”) wheat with normal wheat. Quantitative predictions were made in terms of: i) Truly absorbed rumen synthesized microbial protein in the small intestine; ii) Truly absorbed rumen undegraded feed protein in the small intestine; iii) Endogenous protein in the digestive tract; iv). Total truly absorbed protein in the small intestine; and v). Protein degraded balance. The overall yield losses of the frozen wheat were 24%. Results showed that using the DVE/OEB system to predict the potential nutrient supply, the frozen wheat had similar truly absorbed rumen synthesized microbial protein (65 vs. 66 g/kg DM; p>0.05), tended to have lower truly absorbed rumen undegraded feed protein (39 vs. 53 g/kg DM; p<0.10) and had higher endogenous protein (14 vs. 9 g/kg DM; p<0.05). Total truly absorbed protein in the small intestine was significantly lower (89 vs. 110 g/kg DM, p<0.05) in the frozen wheat. The protein degraded balance was similar and both were negative (-2 vs. -1 g/kg DM). Using the NRC-2001 model to predict the potential nutrient supply, the frozen wheat also had similar truly absorbed rumen synthesized microbial protein (average 56 g/kg DM; p>0.05), tended to have lower truly absorbed rumen undegraded feed protein (35 vs. 48, g/kg DM; p<0.10) and had similar endogenous protein (average 4 g/kg DM; p>0.05). Total truly absorbed protein in the small intestine was significantly lower (95 vs. 108 g/kg DM, p<0.05) in the frozen wheat. The protein degraded balance was not significantly different and both were negative (-16 vs. -19 g/kg DM). In conclusion, both models predict lower protein value and negative protein degraded balance in the frozen wheat. The frost damage to the wheat reduced nutrient content and availability and thus reduced nutrient supply to ruminants by around 12 to 19%.
Keywords: Frost Damaged Wheat; Modeling; Nutrient Supply; Ruminants


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