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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 20(10); 2007 > Article
Ruminant Nutrition and Forage Utilization
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2007;20(10): 1525-1538.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2007.1525    Published online August 30, 2007.
Status of Milk Fat Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) in Selected Commercial Dairies
R. C. Khanal, T. R. Dhiman
Abstract
Because of the increasing evidence of potential benefits of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on human health, there is a need to investigate its status in commercial dairies and develop feeding strategies to enhance the content and supply of CLA in milk and milk products. A two-year experiment was conducted to study the status of milk fat c-9, t-11 CLA on four selected commercial dairy farms in Utah (two) and Idaho (two), USA. Farms A and C grazed cows on pasture and supplemented with 7.0 kg/cow per day of their respective grain mixes during summer, while conserved forage and grain mix was fed during winter. Farm B fed a total mixed diet all year, with 10% of diet dry matter as fresh cut pasture during summer. Farm D had 1/3 of its cows grazed on pasture and supplemented with a total mixed diet during summer, while the rest were fed a total mixed diet. All cows in Farm D were fed a total mixed diet during winter. Farms A, B, C, and D had on average 80, 400, 150, and 500 milking cows, respectively, with Holstein or its crosses as the major breed. On a year-round basis, Farms A and C produced milk with 60% or more milk fat c-9, t-11 CLA and transvaccenic acid (TVA) contents than Farm B. Similarly, Farm D produced 30% or more c-9, t-11 CLA and TVA in milk than Farm B. Milk fat content of CLA and TVA was 150-200% more during summer compared with winter. Individual cows varied from 0.16 to 2.22% in milk fat c-9, t-11 CLA contents and 89% of the cows had c-9, t-11 CLA contents between 0.3 and 1.0% of milk fat. Individual cow variation was larger on Farms A and C compared with Farm D, with least variation on Farm B. Variation was larger in summer than in winter. The bulk tank milk c-9, t-11 CLA content varied from 0.27 to 1.35% of milk fat. Cows on Farms A and C produced similar or higher amounts of milk fat c-9, t-11 CLA on a daily basis even though their milk yield was lowest among the dairies. Concentration and supplies of c-9, t-11 CLA and TVA were highest from June through September and lowest from February through April, which should be the months for targeting improvement in the content and supply of milk fat c-9, t-11 CLA and TVA.
Keywords: Milk Fat; CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid); TVA (Transvaccenic Acid); Commercial Dairies


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