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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 19(5); 2006 > Article
Animal Products
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2006;19(5): 751-755.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2006.751    Published online March 29, 2006.
Adhesion Properties of Indigenous Dadih Lactic Acid Bacteria on Human Intestinal Mucosal Surface
Jorry Dharmawan, Ingrid S. Surono, Lee Yuan Kun*
Correspondence:  Lee Yuan Kun,
Abstract
Dadih is Indonesian traditional fermented buffalo milk believed by the natives to have beneficial effects on human health. This may be due to the probiotic properties possessed by the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) involved in its fermentation process. It was discovered that ten strains of dadih lactic isolates possessed some probiotic properties in vitro. In this study, the adhesion properties of dadih LAB, in comparison with documented probiotic strains, were investigated in vitro by using mucin extracted from human faeces and Caco-2 cells as the models for human intestinal mucosal surface and intestinal cells respectively. The adhesion results showed the distinction of Lactobacillus reuteri IS-27560 in adhering to both mucus layer and Caco-2 cells. The competition assay for adhesion to the mucus layer between dadih LAB and selected pathogens indicated the competence of Lactococcus lactis IS-16183 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus IS-7257 in significantly inhibiting the adhesion of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Accordingly, these two strains may be potential candidates for use as probiotic strains. Overall, the adhesion properties of all dadih LAB strains were relatively comparable to that of Lactobacillus casei Shirota and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, the documented probiotic strains.
Keywords: Dadih; Lactic Acid Bacteria; Adhesion; Probiotics; Mucin; Caco-2 Cells


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