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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 17(1); 2004 > Article
Animal Breeding and Genetics
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2004;17(1): 13-17.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2004.13    Published online January 1, 2004.
The Genetic Development of Sire, Dam and Progenies and Genotype × Environment Interaction in a Beef Breeding System
A. K. F. H. Bhuiyan, G. Dietl, G. Klautschek
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate genetic development and genotype environment interactions (GEI) in postweaning body weight of fattening bulls at the end of test period (WT-T) under various beef fattening environments. Data on a total of 24,247 fattening bulls obtained from the industrial farm, breeding farms and testing stations were used. Heritability estimates for WT-T in all environments were nearly similar. Significant genetic developments of sire, dam and progenies for WT-T were observed in all environments. However, many differences in annual genetic developments between the environments were significant. The genetic correlations for WT-T between industrial farm and breeding farms, industrial farm and testing stations and breeding farms and testing stations were respectively 0.004, 0.004 and 0.013. These low estimates of genetic correlations and significant differences in genetic developments among environments clearly show the existence of GEI for WT-T among various fattening environments. Results of this study indicate the need for environment-specific genetic evaluation and selection of beef bulls for commercial beef production.
Keywords: Breeding; Genetic Development; Genotype-environment Interaction
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