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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 16(7); 2003 > Article
Animal Breeding and Genetics
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2003;16(7): 1025-1029.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2003.1025    Published online January 1, 2003.
Shrimp By-product Feeding and Growth Performance of Growing Pigs Kept on Small Holdings in Central Vietnam
Linh Q. Nguyen, Henk Everts, Anton C. Beynen
Abstract
The effect studied was that of the feeding of shrimp by-product meal, as a source of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, on growth performance and fatty acid composition of adipose tissue in growing pigs kept on small holdings in Central Vietnam. Shrimp by-product meal was exchanged with ruminant meal so that the diets contained either 0, 10 or 20% shrimp by-product meal in the dry matter. The diets were fed on 6 different small-holder farms. The farmers fed a base diet according to their personal choice, but were instructed as to the use of shrimp by-product and ruminant meal. The diets were fed to the pigs from 70 to 126 days of age. There were three animals per treatment group per farm. The diets without and with 20% shrimp by-product meal on average contained 0.01 and 0.14 g docosahexaenoic acid/MJ of metabolisable energy (ME). Due to the higher contents of ash and crude fiber, the shrimp by-product meal containing diets had lower energy densities than the control diets. Eicosapentaenoic acid was not detectable in adipose tissue; the content of docosahexaenoic acid was generally increased after consumption of shrimp by-product meal. In spite of the concurrent high intakes of ash and crude fiber, the feeding of shrimp by-product meal had a general stimulatory effect on growth performance of the growing pigs. The intake of docosahexaenoic acid or its content in adipose tissue was not related with average daily gain. It is suggested that shrimp by-product meal may contain an unknown growth enhancing factor.
Keywords: Pig; Shrimp By-product; Growth; Fatty Acids; Adipose Tissue
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