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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 14(4); 2001 > Article
Review Paper
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2001;14(4): 587-596.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2001.587    Published online April 1, 2001.
Current Status of Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in Livestock Species - Review -
Jong-Joo Kim, Young I. Park
Abstract
In the last decade, rapid developments in molecular biotechnology and of genomic tools have enabled the creation of dense linkage maps across whole genomes of human, plant and animals. Successful development and implementation of interval mapping methodologies have allowed detection of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in experimental and commercial livestock populations. The candidate gene approach can be used in any general population with the availability of a large resource of candidate genes from the human or rodent genomes using comparative maps, and the validated candidate genes can be directly applied to commercial breeds. For the QTL detected from primary genome scans, two incipient fine mapping approaches are applied by generating new recombinants over several generations or utilizing historical recombinants with identity-by-descent (IBD) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping. The high resolution definition of QTL position from fine mapping will allow the more efficient implementation of breeding programs such as marker-assisted selection (MAS) or marker-assisted introgression (MAI), and will provide a route toward cloning the QTL.
Keywords: Quantitative Trait Loci; Interval Mapping; Candidate Gene; Fine Mapping; Marker-Assisted Selection


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