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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 13(6); 2000 > Article
Animal Breeding and Genetics
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 2000;13(6): 729-732.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.2000.729    Published online June 1, 2000.
Effects of Sire Birth Weight on Calving Difficulty and Maternal Performance of Their Female Progeny
U. Paputungan, M. Makarechian, M. F. Liu
Abstract
Weight records from birth to calving and calving scores of 407 two-year old heifers and weights of their offspring from birth to one year of age were used to study the effects of sire birth weight on maternal traits of their female progeny. The heifers (G1) were the progeny of 81 sires (G0) and were classified into three classes based on their sires'''' birth weights (High, Medium and Low). The heifers were from three distinct breed-groups and were mated to bulls with medium birth weights within each breed-group to produce the second generation (G2). The data were analyzed using a covariance model. The female progeny of high birth-weight sires were heavier from birth to calving than those sired by medium and low birth-weight bulls. The effect of sire birth weight on calving difficulty scores of their female progeny was not significant. Grand progeny (G2) of low birth-weight sires were lighter at birth than those from high birth-weight sires (p<0.05) but they did not differ significantly in weaning and yearling weights with the other two Grand progeny groups. The results indicated that using low birth weight sires would not result in an increase in the incidence of dystocia among their female progeny calving at two-year of age and would not have an adverse effect on weaning and yearling weights of their grand progeny.
Keywords: Calving Difficulty; Sire Birth Weight; Growth Rate


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