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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci > Volume 12(3); 1999 > Article
Swine Nutrition and Feed Technology
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 1999;12(3): 400-410.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5713/ajas.1999.400    Published online May 1, 1999.
Effects of Expander Operating Conditions on Nutrient Digestibility in Finishing Pigs
S. L. Traylor, K. C. Behnke, J. D. Hancock, R. H. Hines, S. L. Johnston, B. J. Chae, In K. Han
Abstract
five experiments were conducted using finishing pigs (PIC L326 sires 횞 C15 dams) to examine the effects of expander operating conditions on nutrient digestibility in finishing pigs. The effects of different expanding conditions (0, 11.7, 24.4, 32.5 kg/cm2 for corn-SBM based diets (Exp. 1), wheat meddlings diet (Exp. 2), sorghum-SBM based diets (Exp. 3) and wheat-SBM based diet (Exp. 4). Exp. 5 was conducted as a 2횞4 factorial arrangement and factors examined were 2 soy products (raw soybean and SBM) and 4 expanding conditions (0, 14.1, 28.1, 42.2 kg/cm2. In experiment 1, total production rates (p>0.10) were similar among treatments. The amount of fines decreased (cubic effect, p<0.001) as cone pressure was increased from 0 to 11.7 kg/cm2 with smaller differences as cone pressure was further increased to 35.2 kg/cm2. Nutrient digestibilities increased (p<0.02) as the feed was subjected to higher cone pressures. Digestibilities of DM, N, and GE were maximized at 24.4 kg/cm2 cone pressure. The DE of the diet expanded at 24.4 and 35.2 kg/cm2 increased by 172 and 109 kcal/kg, respectively, compared to the diet processed at 0 kg/cm2 cone pressure. In experiment 2, total production and screened pellets production rates were similar among the processing treatments (p>0.21). The amount of fines decreased (quadratic effect, p<0.03) by 9 kg/h as cone pressure was increased from 0 to 11.7 kg/cm2. Digestibilities of DM (p<0.02), N (p<0.001), and GE (p<0.002) as cone pressure was increased from 0 to 35.2 kg/cm2 DM, N. and GE digestibility in the pigs fed the midds-based diet increased by 8, 13, and 10% respectively, at the highest processing cone pressure compared to the diets without any cone pressure. In experiment 3, the conditioned mash moistures for the treatments were numerically similar around 15% moisture. As the expander cone pressure was increased from 0 to 11.7 kg/cm2 energy consumption for the pellet mill decreased (quadratic effect, p<0.004) from 14.1 to 12.0 kWh/t. Dry matter and gross energy digestibility increased (cubic effects, p<0.006) as cone pressure was increased from 0 to 35.2 kg/cm2 with the largest improvement occurring as cone pressure was increased from 0 to 11.7 kg/cm2. Nitrogen digestibility increased (cubic effect, p<0.001) from 78.3 to 81.0% as the feed was subjected to the higher cone pressures, with N digestibility being maximized at 24.4 kg/cm2 cone pressure. The DE of the diet increased (cubic effect, p<0.001) by 225 kcal/kg as cone pressure was increased from 0 to 35.2 kg/cm2. Also, starch gelatinization moisture decreased and moisture loss increased as cone pressure was increased from 0 to 11.7 kg/cm2. In experiment 4, pellet of the wheat-based diets increased from 16.8 to 49.1% as the diets were processed at 0 and 35.2 kg/cm2 cone pressure. Nutrient digestibilities were not affected (p>0.18) by any increase in cone pressure. In experiment 5, pellet moisure decreased as cone pressure was increased 0 to 35.2 kg/cm2. The amount of moisture loss for the diets expanded at 42.2 kg/cm2 was 3.0 and 3.8% for the SBM and raw soybean (RB) diets, respectively. Starch gelatinization for the SBM diets were 19% greater than the RB diets. The RB diets had lower DM, N and GE digestibilities as compared to the SBM diets. The DE of the RB diets were lower (p<0.02) than the SBM diets. DM (p<0.06), N (p<0.02), and GE (p<0.001) digestibilities of the dietary treatments increased as cone pressure was increased 0 to 42.2 kg/cm2.
Keywords: Expander; Processing Characteristics; Nutrient Digestibility; Finishing Pig


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